Travelling in 2019

It has never been that easy to travel.

More and more countries have opened their doors and made it easier for tourists. Flight tickets are increasingly cheaper. Efficient public transport system and ride sharing applications make it effortless to navigate the city with minimal hassle. English is spoken everywhere, making an unknown city a little less intimidating. A new trend of remote workers, sometimes referred to as “digital nomads” is revolutionising the way we work, live and travel, and do it all at the same time. The collective knowledge of first-hand tips, blogs, customised city guides and anything readily available on Google makes it easier to arm yourself with as much information as possible to tackle any city on whatever budget you desire. There are so many blogs or forums on it if you’re willing to do the research.

A new trend of remote workers, with the self-proclaimed title called “digital nomads” is revolutionising the way we work, live and travel, and do it all at the same time. . The collective knowledge of first-hand tips, blogs, customised city guides and anything readily available on Google makes it easier to arm yourself with as much information as possible to tackle any city on whatever budget you desire. There are so many blogs or forums on it if you’re willing to do the research.

I’m writing this article at 3000 feet above sea level, crossing the South China Sea. I could connect to the wifi if I was willing to pay USD29.99 for 300MB data (and no I didn’t do it, it was not worth it!). We were also mysteriously upgraded to better seats, and we are now enjoying slightly more luxurious and spacious seats at the front end of the plane.

Few minutes earlier, the airline ground staff refused to allow me to board the flight. I had booked a flight to Hangzhou (in China) to attend a friends wedding, then planned to visit the Venice of the East (Suzhou), relying on China’s new 144 hours free visa policy.

Unfortunately, I didn’t read between the lines, and the new visa policy doesn’t cover return flights, with China as a destination. It only covers transits in China. This meant that I literally had to book a last minute ticket to Hong Kong to be able to board the flight.

A dew days earlier, a friend had an eight hour layover in Taipei, Taiwan where I currently live. Even though Even though I have been based in Taiwan for many years, I still had to figure out how he could do the most of Taipei in that short amount of time. How long will it take him from the airport to the city? The alternatives ways to get into the city? How long each spot will it take to visit? What was the most efficient way to reach them from the current one?

Even if everything is available online, in traveling books or magazines, it can take you days or month to figure out your next trip. The information available online isn’t really organised, outdated, or hidden. Where/when to go? What to do during your trip? What’s the “best” price I can get for that those 2 weeks? Is 2 weeks enough? When to buy that flight ticket? You’ll also have to convince your friends/wife/husband/friends. And sometimes you have to cancel the trip because of a sudden increase of hotel/flights or any kind of unfortunate circumstance. There is so many question marks. This is definitely not a common thing to do.

This is why we’ve decided to create Travel Hustlers. We are an awesome and committed community, passionate about travelling and helping people. We want to use our own experience travelliing millions of miles, taking thousands of flights, staying at hundreds of hostel and hotel to help you make the most of your next trip. Join now our exclusive and free community!

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